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Enabling Digital Strategy in Medical Affairs – Have We Made Progress?

Foreword
The Medical Affairs Digital Strategy Council comprises 20 Medical Affairs leaders from a diverse set of pharmaceutical companies with US, EU, and global remits. The Medical Council was formed in 2019 to bring together leaders from the industry to connect, collaborate, and learn from each other and propel Medical Affairs toward a digital future. The focus is to help Medical Affairs organizations embrace technology and innovation through a digital and data-driven model to further unlock growth and maximize the impact across internal and external engagements.
“Digital” has been a key area of focus for Medical Affairs teams across biopharmaceutical and device organizations over the past several years. The thought leadership of the Medical Council is a reflection of the diverse organizations and stages of digital strategy adoption across the membership. This provides a unique collaborative platform to assess the progress of digital adoption over time and allows the reader to reflect on their maturity across digital capabilities and take back insights as they drive digital transformation in their own organizations.
On behalf of the Medical Council, I would like to thank the members for sharing their experiences with enabling digital strategies at their organizations. Through this continuing dialogue, we hope that these learnings will empower Medical Affairs teams to implement digital strategies regardless of their level of maturity.

– Mary Alice Dwyer

Chair, Medical Affairs Digital Strategy Council

Background
In 2021, the Medical Council commissioned a survey of its members to identify areas of digital progress within Medical Affairs and gain greater insights into gaps and opportunities. The survey was repeated in 2022 to assess changes in the priority placed on core capabilities as well as changes in the adoption of best practices. This white paper elaborates on the progress toward the adoption of Medical Affairs digital best practices into routine ways of working.
While COVID-19 accelerated the inevitable adoption of several digital and remote ways of engaging with stakeholders, it is particularly relevant to reflect on past experiences as we collectively settle into the new normal ways of working.
Since the last survey, organizations reported making advancements in their ability to synthesize content, channels, and information from customer interactions to create an experience that is seamless, transparent, and credible for the end user. Although several challenges identified in the first survey continue to persist, the value of the present white paper lies in viewing digital progress from a ground-level based on early experience in implementing these capabilities. For instance, what capabilities are really not worth pursuing? And how to best direct global capabilities at the local market execution level. The present white paper provides information on how the implementation of digital capabilities has evolved since the initial survey.
To our knowledge, this body of work is novel both in being the first of its kind to explore digital evolution through the lens of Medical Affairs organizations and, secondly, in assessing the adoption of digital capabilities at both global and local levels.
Survey Methodology
To determine how the life sciences industry is advancing towards the digital excellence opportunity, a better customer experience (CX), we applied our Digital Excellence Maturity Assessment framework (DEMA). In specific, the DEMA framework:
Assesses key digital capabilities for medical affairs. Six of our framework’s capabilities are HCP-facing and establish a remote communication channel between the HCP and a company, whereas the other five are behind-the-scenes, which represent key technologies required to plan, coordinate or measure the customer experience through these channels (see Figure 5). Each capability has a set of practices associated with it – 123 in total – which are categorized into tiers of complexity to execute. More complex practices typically depend upon prerequisite practices in lower tiers and often require more time, effort and coordination to get right. We reviewed and updated where necessary the list of practices this year to keep pace with upcoming trends and industry needs.
Has leaders rate their organization’s adoption of best practices underpinning each capability. Armed with an up-to-date maturity framework, we collected our data using an online survey sent to senior medical affairs leaders at seventeen large global pharmaceutical companies. Together they have formed a working group that validates the approach and stimulates collaboration across the industry by sharing lessons learned about digital and customer transformation. For each of the eleven key digital capabilities, we asked senior leaders to identify the practices that their organizations deliberately and consistently follow.
Scores maturity based on overall capability creation and adoption. Each firm’s digital excellence (DX) maturity score is determined by the number of practices that MA leaders observe their organizations adopting and using in each capability. A firm that uses half to three-quarters of these practices spread across different capabilities ranks as “good” digital maturity; anything above that is considered “excellent” maturity—the sweet spot for any company and the zone in which the DX-CX imperative comes to fruition fully.
Capabilities Assessed in the Medical Affairs Digital Council DEMA Survey
The following capabilities were assessed in the survey:
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Focus on delivering a consistent and personalized experience to customers across channels and devices
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Field Medical – Remote Interactions
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Remote one-to-one engagements and small meetings between a Medical Affairs person and one or more customers/healthcare professionals (HCPs)
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Field Medical – Interactive Electronic Content
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Interactive electronic tools used in a face-to-face discussion or online meeting between a Medical Science Liaison (MSL) and a customer
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
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CRM Tools
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Customer relationship management (CRM) is a way/system for managing a company’s interactions with current and future customers, often involving technology to organize, automate, and synchronize communications, customer service, and technical support
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Virtual Congress Events
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Activities between groups of HCPs and your Medical Affairs team using remote engagement, such as conferences, ad boards, seminars, symposia, and other group discussions, as well as virtual congresses
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Customer Engagement Analytic Insights
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Tools for analyzing and gaining insights from any type of data that are collected from engagements with customers. Analytics is typically used to generate insights about the customer itself, suggest improvements for engagements with customers, and gain more insights on performance against overall objectives
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Medical Information/ Medical Website
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
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Web pages owned by your company and specific to Medical Affairs
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
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Contact Center
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
An online environment on a website where you can interact with and contact your company through live interactions and discover additional information
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Mobile Apps
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Software applications developed specifically for use on small wireless computing devices such as smartphones and tablets
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Content Creation
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Creating and managing relevant content for digital interactions to attract, service, and engage customers, HCPs, and other stakeholders
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
MLR Review Process
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
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Process of ensuring that all assets undergo the appropriate Medical, Legal, and Regulatory (MLR) or Nominated Signatory review
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Body 1
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Omnichannel Medical Strategy
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Numerous best practices were updated since the initial survey to account for the availability of newer technologies and reflect contemporary practices since the previous study.
Removal of touchpoint integration, as none of the Medical Council members rated this capability as a priority
Revision of “Multichannel Medical Strategy” capability description to “Omnichannel Medical Strategy” capability, recognizing that all organizations already operate across multiple channels and that omnichannel capabilities are almost universally being evaluated
Incorporation of several digital-focused best practices within the MLR capability
Removal of questions related to the impact of COVID-19 on the structural and procedural changes of the Medical Affairs organization
Priorities for Medical Affairs Organizations in their Digital Transformation
Reflecting on the past year and looking to the future, participating organizations were asked about the areas of focus and those that were deprioritized. The answers to both questions were diverse; however, some common themes emerged across the organizations surveyed.
Strategic and insights projects had the highest impact during the past year
Omnichannel is a priority for the next 12 months, along with a focus on piloting to scale up key initiatives
Personalization and presentation of content were identified as having challenges and representing a lower priority in general
The questions and the responses received are shared below:
  • AI-led medical information chatbot

    Insight platform – starting to gather medical insights in a single global platform

    Establishing the omnichannel/personalization strategy

    Enterprise-wide HCP analytical tool

    Develop a strategic vision and start implementation into website activities

    Focusing on engaging digital content formats

    Delivering content creation excellence

    Customer engagement

    Medical insights

    Chat or launch on the Medical website

    Applying digital efforts to customer experience planning

  • Analytics on HCP engagement preferences and customer journey to customize content

    Advanced analytics and moving toward a higher level of decision-making based on data analytics

    Integrative partnership with commercial team on omnichannel

    Fully developed website and content

    Integration of materials and platforms to get closer to omnichannel

    AI/NLP to optimize resources

    Omnichannel data–driven medical strategy focused on unmet medical needs

    Synchronizing all communication channels

    Scaling of digital channels to markets

    Cross-functional components of customer experience planning

    Scaling of the foundational digital channel capabilities and medical content transformation

  • Modular content is a huge undertaking, and it is still not certain if it will be successful

    MSLs “on demand” versus a more customized HCP experience

    Apps

    Automated medical information (large regulatory/legal risk)

    The level of complexity in activating omnichannel strategies is high

    Pharma MA website (uncertainty whether HCPs use these resources)

    MSL- on-demand

    Modular content

    Metrics around the customer lifecycle management (CLM) components of CRM

Thinking about (Medical Affairs) projects in the areas of digital transformation or customer experience that you worked on in the past year, which one was the most impactful for your organization?
AI-led medical information chatbot
Establishing the omnichannel/personalization strategy
Enterprise-wide HCP analytical tool
Develop a strategic vision and start implementation into website activities
Focusing on engaging digital content formats
Insight platform – starting to gather medical insights in a single global platform
Delivering content creation excellence
Customer engagement
Medical insights
Chat or launch on the Medical website
Applying digital efforts to customer experience planning
Thinking about (Medical Affairs) projects in the areas of digital transformation or customer experience that you worked on in the past year, which one was the most impactful for your organization?
AI-led medical information chatbot
Insight platform – starting to gather medical insights in a single global platform
Establishing the omnichannel/personalization strategy
Enterprise-wide HCP analytical tool
Develop a strategic vision and start implementation into website activities
Focusing on engaging digital content formats
Delivering content creation excellence
Customer engagement
Medical insights
Chat or launch on the Medical website
Applying digital efforts to customer experience planning
Thinking about (Medical Affairs) projects in the areas of digital transformation or customer experience, which one do you think would be important to focus on in the next 12 months?
Analytics on HCP engagement preferences and customer journey to customize content
Advanced analytics and moving toward a higher level of decision-making based on data analytics
Integrative partnership with commercial team on omnichannel
Fully developed website and content
Integration of materials and platforms to get closer to omnichannel
AI/NLP to optimize resources
Omnichannel data–driven medical strategy focused on unmet medical needs
Synchronizing all communication channels
Scaling of digital channels to markets
Cross-functional components of customer experience planning
Scaling of the foundational digital channel capabilities and medical content transformation
Thinking about (Medical Affairs) projects in the areas of digital transformation or customer experience, which one would you not want to repeat simply because of overall complexity or a lack of success?
Modular content is a huge undertaking, and it is still not certain if it will be successful
MSLs “on demand” versus a more customized HCP experience
Apps
Automated medical information (large regulatory/legal risk)
The level of complexity in activating omnichannel strategies is high
Pharma MA website (uncertainty whether HCPs use these resources)
MSL- on-demand
Modular content
Metrics around the customer lifecycle management (CLM) components of CRM
Reflections of Progress Toward Digital Excellence
Similar to 2021, the current survey identified gaps between the level of organizational “big picture” commitment to achieving digital excellence and satisfaction with progress toward this endeavor.
The level of agreement with each organizational statement in 2022 is presented in Figure 1.
Figure 1: Respondents’ Sentiment around Organizational Ambition and Progress Towards Digital Excellence
The broader organizational ambition to achieve digital excellence in Medical Affairs is encouraging and not surprising, but it points to on-the-ground execution challenges. The big idea is there, but are Medical Affairs teams equipped and empowered to deliver on this?
The Medical Council generally felt that organizations should have been further along the journey than where they are today.
The following were identified as major causative factors:
Disproportionately higher resourcing for digital competencies in Commercial or Analytics teams versus Medical Affairs
In parallel, an insufficient organizational mindset shift to realize the potential benefits of funding digital capabilities within Medical Affairs
General cultural inertia within Medical Affairs to adopt several digital practices
Uncertainty around compliance making it easier to fall back into familiar ways of working
Maturity levels across several capabilities changed from 2021 to the current survey results. In 2021, most organizations prioritized capabilities that would prepare them to cope with an increased volume of content and overcome barriers to in-person interaction with HCPs (field medical content and virtual events). While the initial survey results demonstrated an exploration of many digital capabilities, the current results suggest a narrowing of focus on fewer capabilities, but with greater proficiency. Potential drivers for significant changes are discussed in subsequent sections.
The ranking of overall DX score for capabilities of interest is summarized in Figure 2
Figure 2: Differences in Digital Excellence (DX) Scores for Participating Organizations Between 2022 and 2021
*Constituent best practices changed substantially since the 2021 survey.
Of note, the DX score for the MLR Review Process changed significantly from 2021. This is primarily the result of the change in the best practices options offered in the 2022 survey, as we adopted a more digital focus and increased the number of best practices from 6 to 13. Because digitally focused best practices were underrepresented in the previous survey, the resultant comparison may not have necessarily been “apples to apples.” Some notable examples of best practices included in the present survey but not the previous one included the adoption of claims libraries, ensuring agency accountability, benchmarking, use of abbreviated review steps depending on the asset, and the use of AI-enabled technologies to streamline manual workflows.
Is a “One Enterprise” Approach to Stakeholder Engagement Within Reach?
Increasingly, organizations are thinking about stakeholder engagement from an enterprise view – a well-coordinated approach that provides a consistent, non-intrusive set of offerings to ultimately assist HCPs in making the best-informed clinical decision for an individual patient.
Historically, Commercial has led the way with digital strategy. Today, we’re seeing Medical Affairs step up…not as a passenger, but as a co-driver. Recognizing our external customers and stakeholders see us as one company, it is integral that Medical and Commercial strategically work together to identify where and when it makes sense to have one “enterprise digital approach”.
Fran Paradiso-Hardy
Vice President and Head of Medical Communications, Astellas Pharma
Compared with the previous survey, there were increases in regional and country rollouts, leadership positions specifically focused on digital, and a 15% increase in companies implementing a specific change management program. Figure 3 summarizes these findings.
Figure 3: Respondents reporting roll-out of digital initiatives at the regional and country level – Differences between 2022 and 2021
Are you enabling roll-out of initiatives to regions and countries?
Local markets are closest to their customers and stand to benefit the most by implementing digital best practices. Practically, many of the Medical Council members reflected that while global teams are working to enable rollouts, local teams often need to work at a faster pace and create several bespoke digital initiatives out of necessity, which eventually do not receive global support from resourcing or IT. This is especially pronounced in ex-US markets. The importance of defining the infrastructure that will enable local pull-through cannot be understated. Figure 4 illustrates an increased level of specific change management initiatives to facilitate digital transformation compared with 2021.
Figure 4: Respondents Reporting Specific Steps Towards Change Management to Enable Digital Transformation – Differences between 2022 and 2021
Have you taken any specific steps towards change management to enable digital transformation?
Modern Medical Affairs teams will need to become fluent in digital capabilities and best practices, and change management will be critical to evolving our current ways of working within Medical Affairs and across teams within the organization, including Commercial, Data and Analytics, and IT teams. Beyond the philosophical acceptance of why digital excellence is important, everything that goes into an operating model must be considered in change management, including
Training to include fluency in technical systems
Global and local processes
RACI (Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, and Informed) frameworks and clear accountabilities
While these observations indicate rational investments to enable digital excellence, the Medical Council provided additional recommendations to further this effort:
Medical Affairs is often late or not included in the dialogue about systems and platforms to enable new communication channels; force-fitting medical requirements into a largely commercial-focused IT landscape has generally led to disappointment
Importance of design thinking in the way customer handoffs happen when they engage with our organizations – it has to be simple
Investments in technology or digital capabilities should be driven by the strategic aims of the organization.
Dominick Albano
Former Head of Global Medical Information at Pfizer
How Has the Implementation of Priority Digital Capabilities Evolved Since 2021?
Similar to the previous survey, each of the 11 digital capabilities was analyzed for global and local implementation.
As a reminder, only those companies that responded as having implemented the capability at a global level were then asked to select which best practices they consistently and deliberately follow related to that capability. Generally, a higher number of survey respondents responded positively to practices being applied in 2022 versus 2021, indicating an overall shift in the adoption of digital capabilities. The only exception was the MLR review process, where there were fewer positive respondents in 2022 (n = 8 ) versus 2021 (n = 10). This was likely because the best practices were revised in the 2022 survey to ensure that they were more digitally focused. This change led to fewer companies implementing more digital best practices.
Several capabilities saw considerable shifts in the implementation of digital capabilities in 2022 versus 2021. The summary of changes in the DX score and global and local adoption for all 11 digital capabilities are presented in Figure 5.
Figure 5: Changes in DX Score and Global and Local Adoption of 11 Digital Capabilities Identified in the DEMA – 2022 Versus 2021
Priority Digital Capabilities for 2021 to 2023
In this section, we present further insights into specific capabilities of interest – Omnichannel Medical Strategy, Content Creation, and Customer Engagement Analytics/Insights. These areas were identified as priorities at present and for the next 12 months by the Medical Council.
Multichannel/Omnichannel Medical Strategy
Figure 6: Changes in DX Score and Global and Local Adoption of Multichannel/Omnichannel Medical Strategy in the DEMA – 2022 Versus 2021
The overall DX score decreased from 50 to 40 from 2021 to 2022. Although omnichannel capabilities have been a focus of Medical Affairs teams for the past 2 to 3 years, the actual implementation has been challenging as evidenced from the countless white papers, internal projects, and coverage at conferences. Global adoption has increased across many organizations during the period of evaluation and focused on setting up foundational capabilities, systems, and processes.
The true value of omnichannel engagement lies in local rollouts, but this is challenging. By definition, the term “omnichannel” refers to the most mature modality of customer engagement and encompasses several competencies such as mapping customers’ channel preferences and developing omnichannel plans cross-functionally. The flat level of local adoption may be explained by internal operational challenges, knowledge gaps, budgetary challenges, and unanticipated on-the-ground issues. Actual implementation has been more difficult than suggested by organizational playbooks and guides.
The Medical Council recommends that emphasis be put on tools that meet local market needs and are useful for facilitating adoption. While omnichannel implies many channels, it may be more useful to optimize even a single channel first. This sentiment is evidenced by some organizations referring to “omnichannel” as “enhanced engagement” or “advancing customer engagement” to keep teams focused on evaluating practical solutions for their most pressing engagement priorities as opposed to achieving a notional omnichannel benchmark.
This “Omnichannel” needs to ladder into the overarching strategy of what we want to achieve, and then omnichannel is the way to get there.
Jung Lee
Sr. Director, Medical Information, AstraZeneca
Content Creation
Figure 7: Changes in DX Score and Global and Local Adoption of Content Creation in the DEMA – 2022 Versus 2021
Overall DX scores for Content Creation remained relatively flat between 2021 and 2022. While 88% global adoption is significant, the relatively stagnant DX score suggests that there is room for improvement.
Local adoption of best practices was low at 20%, pointing to the significant effort required to optimize the global-to-local connection, including reuse, review process, approval, and sharing with Medical Affairs colleagues across markets. This is particularly important as content formats have evolved to be more conducive to digital channels – shorter, layered (basic information with deep dive capability), and with navigation features. In addition, content in the modern view also considers optimal placement so that it is easy for the intended customer to surface it based on their specific inquiry. Many local teams are not accustomed to writing and reviewing content with these principles in mind.
While this space evolves based on preferences and functionalities, many teams underappreciate the budget and effort required to create and then maintain the content over time. Is it time to challenge the current model of creating once and maintaining in perpetuity? The Medical Council reflected that it may be opportune to look outside of pharma for examples of how to make content engaging yet simple to maintain while respecting principles of presenting fair and balanced information.
Technologies like generative AI are advancing so rapidly, we don’t fully appreciate the impact they’ll have, but it’s critical our digital strategies have to include the innovations and automations they’ll bring. We’ll be able to automate many of our current tasks, which will free up resources to drive new ways of working.
Andrew Fariello
Vice President , Global Medical Capabilities, Oncology, AstraZeneca
Customer Engagement Analytics/Insights
Figure 8: Changes in DX Score and Global and Local Adoption of Customer Engagement Analytics/Insights in the DEMA – 2022 Versus 2021
The overall DX score for Customer Engagement Analytics and Insights remained constant, but with significant increases in both global and local adoption.
With a proliferation of digital channels and content, the Medical Council felt that analytics was an imperative capability to take decision-making to a higher level. Considering a broader audience beyond KOLs, the ability to recognize trends in sentiment is critical to linking what Medical Affairs is communicating and the impact it can have on scientific-based decision-making.
Equally, the Medical Council felt that to ensure the analytics capability was successful, long-term investments would be necessary. While there have been improvements in automation to parse ever-increasing customer engagement datasets, the act of deriving insights remains a human-dependent one.
Of note, there was a clear increase in best practices for standardizing processes for ingesting insights and defining KPIs. There was a decrease in best practices in the utilization of insights to review the medical strategy for improving the next iteration of plans. This indicates a clear gap in the collection of insights and using those insights to drive subsequent medical strategies. There is an opportunity to build new skill sets and competencies so new best practices can be incorporated into critical Medical Affairs deliverables.
The medical strategy plan should be at the center of what a team wants and needs to know. Insights are most meaningful when they can inform your strategy, so connecting your insight questions to your medical strategy delivers is critically important.
Mary Alice Dwyer
Vice President , US Synetic Life Sciences, Council Chair
The Way Forward
Despite the challenges and limited progress described earlier in this white paper, Medical Affairs organizations remain steadfast in exercising their unique ability to drive clinical practice changes to benefit patients. Digital capabilities have become a critical enabler through which Medical Affairs will continue to deliver on this critical value.

The ability to efficiently connect an HCP to high-quality evidence or a knowledgeable person has never been so important; a hybrid face-to-face and digital engagement model is here to stay. The past few years have been experimental, with a lot of channels and content being put into the market. As the dust is beginning to settle, our attention must shift to ensuring that HCPs have simple access to our scientific material from within their usual clinical care workflows.

An insight shared by the Medical Council is that one of the greatest obstacles to advancing digital strategy is that content, execution, and measurement conversations have been eclipsed by a focus on omnichannel. Omnichannel is not the same as digital strategy. The Medical Council felt that reassessing what channels could most improve scientific engagement and then focusing on developing them into the best they can be would have a greater impact than pursuing many channels with little focus or excellence.
Simple and practical solutions, even in a single channel, can be challenging and require new ways of thinking and working. Medical Affairs foundations in science and clinical practice uniquely position our team to identify channels and content that can impact HCPs’ ability to improve their patient care. Digital strategy should therefore be viewed as the enabler of delivering the value of Medical Affairs and not the ultimate goal in itself.

References

1.
Medical Affairs Digital Strategy Council | https://www.indegene.com/what-we-think/industry-councils/medical-affairsdigital- strategy-council
2.
Digital Excellence (DX) Maturity Assessment | https://dt-consulting.com/digital-excellence-dx-maturity-assessment/
3.
Aspiration vs Actuality: Assessing the progress of digital excellence in Medical Affairs | https://www.indegene.com/whatwe-think/reports/aspiration-vs-actuality-assessing-the-progress-of-digital-excellence-in-medical-affairs

Acknowledgements

This white paper is written by the members of the Medical Affairs Digital Strategy Council, with active contributions from:
Mary Alice Dwyer
Vice President, US Synetic Life Sciences, and Council Chair
Andrew Fariello
Vice President, Global Medical Capabilities, Oncology, AstraZeneca
Dominick Albano
Former Head of Global Medical Information, Pfizer
Fran Paradiso-Hardy
Vice President and Head of Medical Communications, Astellas Pharma
Jung Hyun Lee, PharmD
Sr. Director, Medical Information, AstraZeneca
Sandeep Gantotti
Associate Vice President, Enterprise Medical Solutions, Indegene
Writing support was provided by Quentin Boyes, Smarteez Ltd. The whitepaper also received inputs from:
Thierry Aupérin
Vice President, Medical Communications and Training, Alnylam Pharmaceuticals
Moshe Cykert
Head of CMO (GMA & GEVD) Digital Strategy Realization, Merck KGaA
Maureen Feeney
Vice President Medical and Scientific Communications, Takeda
Catrinel Galateanu, MD
Vice President, Head of Global Medical Affairs at UCB
Sarah Guadagno
Vice President, Global Medical Communications, Alexion Pharmaceuticals
Rick Lones
Global Head of Medical Affairs, Mundipharma
Heather Abourjaily
Head of Global Scientific Communications, Vertex Pharmaceuticals
Roy Palmer
Former Vice President, Global Medical Affairs Operations Lead, Pfizer
Jennifer Riggins
President, Medical Affairs and Digital, JSR Medical Affairs Consulting, LLC
Richard Swank, Ph.D
Global Field Medical Lead, Amgen
David Tang, PharmD
Vice President, Medical Affairs Operations, AbbVie
Ravi Tayi, MD, MPH
CMO, American Regent
Robin Winter-Sperry, MD
Vice President, Medical Affairs Global Field Medical Lead, Ipsen
Michael Kavanaugh, BS, MBA
Executive Director, Clinical Development and Medical Affairs Effectiveness and Scientific Communications, Boehringer Ingelheim
Joanne Jani
Head, Omnichannel Medical Communications, Regeneron
Venkiteshwar Manoj
Head of Medical Affairs and Professional Education, ZEISS Medical Technology